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Considered as one of the greatest 20th century American novelists, Ernest Hemingway is remembered mostly for his literary contributions, such as “The Old Man and the Sea” and “A Moveable Feast”. But the Pulitzer and Nobel Prize winner was more than a writer.

Know more about the man behind Ernest Hemingway with these snippets from his early life and legacy to the world.

 

Ernest Hemingway: Early Years

Ernest Hemingway Quotes

On July 21, 1899, in Oak Park, Illinois, the future American novelist, short story writer, and journalist Ernest Miller Hemingway was born. He was the firstborn son of Clarence Edmonds Hemingway, a physician, and Grace Hall Hemingway, a musician. Hemingway was said to have been named after his mother’s father Ernest Hall.

Growing up, it was his father, Clarence Edmonds, who would instil in him a sense of adventure by teaching him how to hunt and fish. His mother also tried to teach him music, which caused conflict between them. However, Hemingway would later find these music lessons useful when he would write “For Whom the Bell Tolls”.

Ernest Hemingway lived a full life: he traveled, joined the Red Cross during WWI, became a journalist, and fell in love – several times in fact. His first romance was Agnes von Kurowsky, a Red Cross nurse seven years his senior. Sadly, she left him for another man, just a couple of months after they agree to marry.

His first marriage was with Hadley Richardson. They lived and worked in Paris, where Hemingway met the likes of Gertrude Stein, James Joyce, and Ezra Pound. Three more marriages would follow soon after, with his last and fourth wife being Mary Welsh.

It was Hemingway’s style to finish his writings during his travels. So it shouldn’t be a surprise that one of his most famous works, “A Moveable Feast” was the result of him finding old scribbles he did from his time in Paris in 1928. When he and his wife decided to move back to the United States from Finca Vigia in Cuba, it was believed that Hemingway left manuscripts, books, and art (expropriated by the Cuban government) in a vault in Havana.

Ernest Hemingway suffered from depression and sickness during the last years of his life. After suffering from accidents (a car accident and two plane crashes) and attempting to work in other places (like New York), he finally moved to Idaho.

His nagging worries, the death of fellow writers he considered friends, as well as later diagnoses that would reveal he had mental illness, perhaps all contributed to his death on the morning of July 2, 1961. On that day, Ernest Hemingway reportedly shot himself with his favorite shotgun.

 

The Legacy of Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway Legacy Collage

It could be said that Ernest Hemingway and his style of writing heavily influenced what American writing is to this day and age. His short, lean narrative delivers the story in one of the best ways it could be – straightforward. It was his mastery of this style (and his work on “The Old Man and the Sea”) that won him the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954.

Hemingway was by no means a perfect man – but he made his mark in history forever. His stories are now regarded as classics. Whether you’re a writer or you simply love words, his writing is a classic go-to for inspiration. For more ideas (and maybe a dash of motivation), check out these quotes from Ernest Hemingway.

 

Inspirational Ernest Hemingway Quotes

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Posted by Igor Ovsyannykov

I'm a digital nomad and entrepreneur bouncing around South East Asia. When I'm not working here, I'm out taking photos. Follow me on Instagram: @igorovsyannykov

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